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Thread: Newbie member with a Chelsea Clock US Navy

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Jan 2018
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    Default Newbie member with a Chelsea Clock US Navy

    Hello,

    Newbie member here, got a Chelsea Clock US Navy clock for Christmas from my father-in-law (ex-US Navy). My father-in-law's brother was in navy stores, and he somehow obtained the clock and gave it to my father-in-law a forgotten number of decades ago. As you can see in the photo the serial number on the face has been defaced, but it is 4 digits followed by E. I know that the serial number is somewhere inside the case, but I am not taking this clock apart, and I do not know if it is worth getting it sent back to Chelsea Clocks for them to open up the case and look inside. I did look at values online and ebay and retailers prices looked exorbitant, so I was wondering if anyone knew a reasonable ballpark value in the US. If the clock is worth a reasonable amount, then I might send it off to Cheslea Clock to be restored. The clock runs and has not undergone any prior restoration work (has been sitting in a cupboard for decades) and all I have done is wipe some dust off. My father-in-law is trying to see if he has the key.




  2. #2
    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Jan 2009
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    Montana USA
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    Prices are all over the place on these 200-400 depending on condition. Most clock repair shops can service them for around 100-250 for a service. Chelsea will charge you 400 or more heard they were expensive for a service. Since it got family history if I were you keep it.

  3. #3
    Member
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    Feb 2016
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    Ohio, US
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    Keys aren't a problem, I can't remember which size they take at the moment but it's a standard size that's available. If nothing is broken River Rat is right on the money on a reasonable service charge for one. You're wasting money sending it back to Chelsea. There are plenty of independent shops out there that can do just as good of a cleaning job for a lot less money. I've serviced more than a few of them myself though the years.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
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    Jan 2018
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    Thanks most kindly for the responses. I would normally keep something like this (manic history buff), but I have to consider paying bills. I did manage to look at the back of the movement, and the serial number is 337646, which puts it somewhere in the middle of WW2 (1940-1944). Fat chance of ever finding out what vessel she may have been on, but it is still a wonderful piece of history.

  5. #5
    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    Mar 2007
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    Northern California
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    I've never been inside a Chelsea but most clocks of all sorts are usually not running because the steel pivots are turning in brass plates. The holes become oval and the very strong springs keep them going until they are really bad. The cure is to bore a new hole and insert a new round hardened plug in the plate. This makes them run like a clock. I have a wonderful prewar Japanese Aichi 8 day chime wall clock that needs this done. I have no tools for clocks.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    21

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    Here's my experience with Chelsea. The factory is a 15 minute drive from here, so I took another model to them for a repair estimate. They told me that they place the "problematic old works, dial, and hands" with brand new ones. I declined the service since the value of my 100 year old mantle clock would have been seriously diminished. I have a Chelsea Model 1 Deck Clock, dated 1942, on my office wall. It was "liberated" by my Dad, has never been serviced, and loses about 30 seconds per week.

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