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Thread: INGERSOLL TP?WT POCKET WATCH

  1. #1
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    Default INGERSOLL TP?WT POCKET WATCH

    I recently bought the above, sold as a military timepiece, but I have been unable to find out anything about it. Can anyone help?
    It's an American-made Ingersoll, Serial No 76439190, with a black face and luminous numerals (12 hours) and hands; there is a separate second-hand "clock" at the bottom of the face. On the face is printed "I", and, below that, "TP/WT". There are no markings on the case.
    Any advice gratefully received!

  2. #2

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    These are recorded in late 1940s UK MoD disposal documents, so must have existed! - any chance of a photo? The consensus seems to be that these budget/imported watches were used by wireless operators and that whereas high-grade watches were shielded/modified against electro-magnetic radiation, these Ingersolls appear to be immune from such extraneous radiation.... someone must know the full story!

    Alas Ingersoll's history is poorly recorded (other than the joint Smiths venture). They are a much underrated company/product range, which deserves writing up (I'm too old now!); their archives are at the British museum.

    Barry

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    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
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    this is what Taylerson has to say on the matter -

    Watches, Non-Magnetic, W.T.
    This instrument appears to have been promulgated by Paragraph 23829 amongst a small 1920/21 cluster of Paragraphs launching the Marconi Pattern 'W.T. Sets, motor pack'. Priced at l.3s.Od. In the 1940 Vocabulary, this pocket watch seems unlikely to have been of quality and its antimagnetic feature may have lain solely in a plated iron case. It was declared obsolescent during 1926 or 1927 by Paragraph A232l. The reasons for its reintroduction for "...all W.T. and Wireless complete stations..." by Paragraph A8531 (during March 1934), therefore, are as obscure as the watch's make-up, but just may have been economic. At all events, it was still in the List at 1954, and only deleted by a 1957 amendment of the Vocabulary.

  4. #4

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    Thanks Dave, as ever!

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    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    These watches are better than people think they are. Kind of like Timex. My wife's Uncle was stationed on some God forsaken island in the south pacific during WW2. It was somewhere around Lae or Buna just up from Australia. There were about a dozen guys on this rock manning a radio station. Their only timepiece was a Bullseye pin lever watch similar to an Ingersoll. They would wind it and hand it off to the next guy on duty. He finally sent home and his wife bought him a Rolex Oyster "Turtle" from Portland, Oregon. They then had a proper timepiece to fight the war. He raved about that old $2 pocket watch.

  6. #6

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    Well said, Dave!

    The Ingersoll TP.WT is dentified as army store code VC.7749 in 1946 disposal documents but I suspect is not stamped on the case back.

    Barry

  7. #7
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    Gentlemen,
    Many thanks for all your replies - such erudition!
    No (sadly), there are no markings on the back of the case, which I might have expected, given that the face bears military "markings" (I am assuming that "TPWT" did not appear on the civilian version of this watch - if indeed there was a civilian version!). I will try to post a photo (if I can can get to grips with the tecnology - I'm very much in the clockwork age!).
    Regards,
    Mike

  8. #8

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    Long live clockwork and Ludditeism!

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