Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Smiths GS pair

  1. #1

    Cool Smiths GS pair

    I thought people might be interested in seeing these - I was lucky enough to purchase the Smiths GS dials and case from the Cheltenham auction earlier in the year.

    Both dials were with incorrect movement (i.e. not 0434E hacking movements). By an amazing stroke of luck I had a number of spares of these from an old ebay auction several years back.

    I was therefore able to put together correct movements for both, albeit with some parts gratefully scrounged from John Senior.

    The single case that came in the auction lot was clearly a prototype - the crystal was glued in place, rather than being held by the screw in ring. I had a part fabricated for this, but when I came to assemble it the duct cover / antimagnetic shield was too deep and wouldn't allow the case back to screw in. I reduced the dust cover down on the lathe (there were a number in the auction, so I felt this was acceptable - I didn't touch the others). The cover / shield seems also to be a prototype - as far as I know the final production one is similar to that found in the W10?

    Ok so up until two weeks ago I had two movements complete with dials and hands but only one case. The gods must have been smiling on me though because at the Bonhams auction there was a Smiths 6b/542 complete with a W10 dial and handset. I was lucky enough to get this for a song - I guess the wrong dial was putting people off.

    This week therefore I was able to finally assemble two complete Smiths. I put the radium lume'd dial in the military marked case and the unlume'd dial and handset in the prototype case.

    Fair to say that I'm rather pleased with this pair! I thought you might all appreciate seeing them too








  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    21

    Default

    They are lovely, well done sir.

    Regards,
    Bob Sutton.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,583

    Default

    Nice work.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    104

    Default

    Amazing story, and fantastic pair. Rarer still with the original radium dials without the circle-T. Maybe just a couple of others around.

  5. #5

    Default

    Really nice when watches are given another chance through dedication and passion. great to see a prototype as well.

    Talking of smith deluxe military watches, I see our little friend has appeared again

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/50s-Smith...4AAOSwoVNZ9yUC

  6. #6
    Member hookedseven's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Brit in Germany
    Posts
    675

    Default

    Fantastic job

  7. #7
    Member obsoletewatchparts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Yorkshire England
    Posts
    397

    Default Smiths prototype?

    Well done Crispin, they look beautiful. great job getting them together too.
    As it happens, in amongst my job lots from the Cotswold suction I got a 27cs movement non hacking with silvered dial, with the shorter GS hands also painted white too.
    maybe it belonged in your case?
    Note no serial number or date code stamped on..
    John.




  8. #8
    Moderator Revo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1,295

    Default

    John, that hang tag is interesting:

    12''' = 12 linge

    with H/S fn = with Hacking Seconds function?

    spec S.S.5 / S.S.6 = no idea but there is that mysterious GS De Luxe with SS4 on the dial . . . .
    "Early this year I saw ex-army watches exhibited in a showcase at a little under 4 each. A week or two later I succeeded in buying one of them for 5. Recently their price seems to have risen to 8." (George Orwell, "As I Please", Tribune, 29th November 1946)

  9. #9

    Default

    I can't see a stop-balance (hack) lever or finger spring. SS could mean 'Smiths Service' (watch). Interesting that it is SmithS without DeLuxe, possibly reflecting two 'brands' to be sold side by side?

    There must have been dozens of proposed variants; I'm surprised so many have survived as abandoned prototypes were usually scrapped.

  10. #10
    Member obsoletewatchparts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Yorkshire England
    Posts
    397

    Default

    Ollie I thought that it referred to the Hairspring. I use H/S myself as an abbreviation for "hairspring". I also got a load of uncoiled hairspring lengths in the lots
    so presumed that the movement was being used for testing h/s material.
    there is no hacking function.
    Mysterious!

  11. #11
    Moderator Revo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1,295

    Default

    Ah yes H/S = hairspring! And I think Smiths’ own in-house preferred term for hacking was “stop work”?

    But the SS thing is interesting.
    "Early this year I saw ex-army watches exhibited in a showcase at a little under 4 each. A week or two later I succeeded in buying one of them for 5. Recently their price seems to have risen to 8." (George Orwell, "As I Please", Tribune, 29th November 1946)

  12. #12

    Default

    'Stop-balance' is more correct as I think 'stop-work' applies to a physical stop in the main-spring to maintain uniform tension during unwinding. I've no idea where 'hack' comes from!

  13. #13
    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Blighty
    Posts
    7,107

    Default


    here's a reference image of the SS4 movement -





    image credit: shepcs

  14. #14
    Moderator Revo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    1,295

    Default

    That's the baby! (There's also the so-called "SS4" which keeps popping up on eBay but let's not go there . . . . )

    This one, the "real" SS4 does not have the right movement for a GS De Luxe (27CS) but rather a cal 60466E as per the W10. The "date code" is 34 = March 1964 (date codes on the earlier 27CS seem to be y/m rather than m/y), but they are interchangeable in terms of size and stem height.
    "Early this year I saw ex-army watches exhibited in a showcase at a little under 4 each. A week or two later I succeeded in buying one of them for 5. Recently their price seems to have risen to 8." (George Orwell, "As I Please", Tribune, 29th November 1946)

  15. #15
    Senior Member isologue's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,010

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brenellic2000 View Post
    'Stop-balance' is more correct as I think 'stop-work' applies to a physical stop in the main-spring to maintain uniform tension during unwinding. I've no idea where 'hack' comes from!
    I recently ventured upon a book written by Richard Good (of Smiths fame) in which he obsesses a little about stop work. In his glossary, he defines it as 'The arrangement fitted to a fusee or to a going barrel to limit the number of turns of winding. Always at the top end to prevent the spring being fully wound, and with going barrels usually limiting the number of turns by also stopping the barrel before it is unwound'. 'Stop work is used to eliminate the very high torque given by the mainspring when fully wound. Accordingly, further winding is prevented when there is still about half a turn to a turn (or even more) of winding to go, before the fully wound condition is reached. It also prevents the mainspring from running down fully, although there is no great virtue in this.'

    I'm not sure why this feature should be promoted above others, but RG seemed to be keen on it.

    Regards,

    Martin (isologue)

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,583

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by isologue View Post
    It also prevents the mainspring from running down fully, although there is no great virtue in this.' (isologue)
    This is a feature of some high-end automatic watches, I think possibly seen on Jaeger Le Coultre. It solves the problem of when an automatic watch is worn when initially run-down and not manually wound up. The wearer gives the watch a couple of shakes, and immediately the watch starts to run with “good” amplitude as the mainspring has been held at a tension which provides good torque. Without the stop work, the watch initially runs with poor amplitude and timekeeping will be worse in comparison.

    In pocket watches, you often find “Geneva stop work” aka a “Maltese Cross”, but watchmakers often remove these as they are perhaps faulty, or they are too lazy to service them correctly.

  17. #17

    Default

    Thanks Martin and Roddy! I was close!! Now then, your starter for 10: From where does hack/hack-set come?

    Barry

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •