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Thread: I bought one of these, what is it? Longines 19.73N Double Face

  1. #21
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    Thanks anyway…

    I'm trying to have mine repaired. The original technical data (Fourinturenblatt) would be useful. My doubleface is from 1929, and I think the case is steel, not silver. And calibre 19.73N. I wonder where you got the photo:
    http://i.imgur.com/iAu1j17.jpg
    I made it before the first repair-attempt. The dial was touched up a bit and the glass replaced then, but that was the easy part. I am still looking for a balance wheel, opinions on what works differ :-) and I am no specialist, so…

    I know where it came from in my family, so I doubt it is a military watch – it is also too fragile (any drop will break its balance… speaking from experience…). I do wonder who would need such a watch for what?

  2. #22
    Senior Member Seiji's Avatar
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    If the replacement part is too difficult to find in your area, perhaps buying a single faced watch and using it for a donor maybe an options. The double faced chronograph appears to be an extremely rare watch in America and perhaps the rest of the world. It would be worth it to me to buy a donor movement from eBay. Can we see what your dial looks like after repairs?

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seiji View Post
    It would be worth it to me to buy a donor movement from eBay. Can we see what your dial looks like after repairs?
    Indeed, good idea! But I'd need advice to know what works. The balance staff is very probably broken in any movement sold for parts. There are other two wheels with bent staffs, probably also from the falls, and a broken stone. I guess the more common accidents already happened. What do you / you all/ :-) think?

    Are stones identical and replaceable fronm a donor movement? What other movements may have parts that fit? 19.73 and 19.73N were in production for about 30 years, I'd guess Longines calibres have parts in common. The 19.73N balance staff height is unique, but the wheel may be fit. And so on. I'd be grateful for further advice.

    I couldn't find out how to add an image to my post. Shall I PM you?

    But I remembered where I put the image you used: http://forums.watchuseek.com/attachm...4&d=1484352049

    :-)

  4. #24
    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
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  5. #25
    Senior Member Seiji's Avatar
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    I think you misunderstood me. If it were me, I would buy a fully working 19.73N pocket watch for $750 USD and use it for it's donor parts if there is that much damage to your watch. There is often watches with broken dials that will go a little cheaper but otherwise keeps proper time. I make the assumption that most of the parts are the same for the single and double faced versions. The other way is to send it to Longines and they will repair the movement for about $2500, which is down right criminal how much they charge for the repairs. I think there is a huge value difference between a perfect dial and a damaged dial, so I wouldn't spend too much on my own watch. If you find a perfect dial but decide too expensive, let me know!

  6. #26
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    Thank you, Dave. Yes that's my movement after the cleaning. Cleaning etc. cost about 1000 € - and was not a 100% good job. Longines refused to even consider repairing it and sent it back, and also sent me some photos of the naked caliber :-)

    Even a working watch has probably had its balance replaced, no? I'd spend that money, but to find out whether it is well spent I need professional advice, as I said…

    What should I let you know? I don't understand what you suggest: splitting the cost between us? That might be a good idea. I don't care much that my dial is dinged. It's part of its history. When this watch fell, it is so heavy that the feet of the dial bent a bit and the enamel crackled there. So better not screw it too tight :-)

    Yes I learned a few things, but I am a graphic designer, no watchmaker. And it's a bit late to start with such an expensive hobby – I just want this watch to be in a close to original condition, personal tracks and marks and all, but work reliably and be usable. That's all :-)

  7. #27
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    for instance, here you have a golden version from about the same time as mine, same caliber but with some different addons.
    golden Longines https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/mxkAA...ZK/s-l1600.jpg

  8. #28
    Senior Member Seiji's Avatar
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    Best to find an experienced watchmaker in your area and consult with him/her about this donor. I know little about this movement. I have used donor watches for rare parts for many watches. It’s normal for this hobby. I am disappointed to hear Longines refused to fix your watch. It looks to be in reasonable condition.

    Did you note that the Longines Museum double face 19.73N is Silver. It says on the exhibit plaque. Steel watches of this era from Longines is rather harder to find.

  9. #29
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    :-) The one in the museum is 32 years older and has the 19.73 caliber. The 19.73N was first made in 1909, I think. Mine was made in 1929.

    You seem to be right about the case. When I first got it, it was blank although my sister said it 'd been untouched for 50 years (silver would have been sulfide-blackened). Now I just tested it – feels like 850. Thank you for insisting with your tip! :-))

    How did I come upon the idea it is steel? Longines wrote it is „a pocket chronograph in metal. It is fitted with a Longines manually wound mechanical movement, caliber 19.73N”. The watchmaker who cleaned it later mentioned the “steel case” in passing. He did a good (expensive) job, but also made some obvious and unexplained mistakes. One of them was a brutal polish, in a sandpapered look. I wondered why and now I'm guessing he believed the case is steel, so he took the wrong polishing tools to it at first, then covered the error with this odd polish. And did not admit the mistake. He later re-polished it in a more fitting manner. Does this sound plausible?

    What did you mean with I should let you know if I find a dial?

  10. #30
    Senior Member Seiji's Avatar
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    I just noticed the gold watch has different regulator. Maybe not good donor match. I meant I am looking for backside dial. Not side that indicates time. The multicolor side.

  11. #31
    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by papazulu View Post
    Nice watch, nice complication...The last sentence sends shivers down my spine, I'd hate to think, that is the final fate of my collection!
    Why I was thinking finding a museum that shows stuff like we collect for there final resting spot hate to se mine split up to all corners of the world to some who wont appreciate them and just see dollar signs and resale them for a buck.

  12. #32
    Senior Member Seiji's Avatar
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    Exactly, my rare watches, I want to go to Seiko Museum and other museums. My dad gave several mint condition Hamilton dress watches from 1930s to my cousins. They water damaged them, sold them, broke them, and lost them. Mirror dials, copper dials, original cut glass crystals, 14k... Museum is where the good stuff needs to go! Family are the worst. No depth to appreciation for history or mechanical art. It’s just cash.
    Last edited by Seiji; 11-11-2017 at 06:54.

  13. #33
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    Default ok

    ok. And if you find a donor, same :-)

  14. #34
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    The regulator is not so important. The rest is … stones, wheel, staffs, balance etc.

  15. #35
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    Default donor?

    Found a donor – thank you again for your advice. See image here.
    The regulator is different, the model seems to be older, the stones are partly clear instead of red, and it has no serial number – curiously, I never saw a Longines without a serial. The metal is not smooth as by other 19.73Ns.
    Any idea what all this means? :-)

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