Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Benrus GG-W-113 Repair Quote

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    3

    Default Benrus GG-W-113 Repair Quote

    Hi there,

    I have a 1969 Benrus GG-W-113 which I bought from a UK watch forum and until recently has been running beautifully. Suddenly it started loosing time drastically and to cut a long story short I sent it off to a watch repair for a quote to fix it.
    Apparently the main spring needs replacing plus an overhaul. The total quote is for over 200 which given the watch cost me around that seems excessive. Apparently they would need to recreate the main spring and overhaul the watch.

    Can anyone tell me:
    a/That is a reasonable quote for a main-spring (or is it excessive)?
    b/Are there any NOS main springs available or is it true that it would need to be made by hand?
    c/Anyone in the UK who would be available and cheaper but reliable?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,468

    Default

    Nobody in the right mind would make a mainspring from scratch for a watch like that. Perhaps there was a miscommunication in the shop (they didn't say hairspring, did they?). A standard mainspring should do, and will be around 10. A lot of watchmakers will replace the mainspring as part of an overhaul anyway. 200 sounds a bit steep. Ask around.

  3. #3
    Member maxgara1979's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    122

    Default

    Here in Australia a number of watchmakers have quoted me anything from AUD100 to 400 for serving my field watches. Although the watchmaker I'm currently going to is reasonably priced and super reliable, I found that most of the cheapies around are not terribly skilled.. Anyway, there are plenty of spare parts around for those ETA movements. Only the hairsprings and a few other parts were made by Benrus, the rest is quite straightforward to source.

  4. #4
    Senior Member bobsy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,874

    Default

    1969 Benrus GG-W-113 should have a DR2F2 movement, which is based on ETA 23XX series.
    You might not be able to source an exact replacement mainspring but there should be modern equivalents that will fit.
    These watches are not easy to service as they have a one-piece case that opens through the crystal.

  5. #5
    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    3,046

    Default

    I'd say that they are not difficult at all. The mainsprings are all going to be alloy and for our purposes can be reused as they don't set like the old blue springs. The difference in what is happening is that some guys will strip the hands and dial and toss it into a cleaning machine, rinse in a lubricating solution, half ass dry it, remount the dial and hands and call it a service. On some watches the latent rinse will leech out with use and these are the dials that have large areas that are discolored essentially wrecking the dial.
    The proper cleaning requires a complete tear down cleaning and reassembly with use of proper oils which are frightfully expensive. I really don't see a need to peg and clean every jewel as was routine in the pre 60s days. The old lubricants contained animal products which required this step, today not so. However a really good watchmaker may go that far and if so you will pay for this extra care. The secrets of success are to put the proper AMOUNT of PROPER oil in the right place. Done poorly, you are wasting your time.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Ohio, US
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    I'd say that they are not difficult at all. The mainsprings are all going to be alloy and for our purposes can be reused as they don't set like the old blue springs. The difference in what is happening is that some guys will strip the hands and dial and toss it into a cleaning machine, rinse in a lubricating solution, half ass dry it, remount the dial and hands and call it a service. On some watches the latent rinse will leech out with use and these are the dials that have large areas that are discolored essentially wrecking the dial.
    The proper cleaning requires a complete tear down cleaning and reassembly with use of proper oils which are frightfully expensive. I really don't see a need to peg and clean every jewel as was routine in the pre 60s days. The old lubricants contained animal products which required this step, today not so. However a really good watchmaker may go that far and if so you will pay for this extra care. The secrets of success are to put the proper AMOUNT of PROPER oil in the right place. Done poorly, you are wasting your time.
    What he said. I've been doing watch repair for 27 years now and have run into quite a few of the ones that were cleaned whole and then "lubed" with Plastilube or Solo-lube or similar products. I've had them show up on my bench that I had to soak in Naptha for a while to even be able to get them apart where the "lube" had dried up and effectively glued the movements together. Not to mention that with the "clean it whole" approach there is a tendency for cleaning solution to get trapped in the mainspring barrel and ruin mainsprings. A proper service consists of complete disassembly, inspection of all parts, cleaning, re-inspection of all parts, assembly, lubrication, regulation and recasing. Then the watch gets run and tested for several days. Now, all of that being said these watches are pretty simple movements and parts are available if needed at nominal expense. In my opinion the 200 quote is pretty high for a simple service and generic mainspring replacement.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •