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Thread: Just picked this up 1927 Big Ben alarm clock

  1. #1
    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Default Just picked this up 1927 Big Ben alarm clock

    The price was right were I live the electricity goes out a lot during winter and with digital alarm clocks all they do is flash after the juice goes off. Well a old wind up still keeps going and don't need electricity. So I started looking for vintage alarm clocks on line. I got this one from a guy who rebuilds them into animated ones I got this Big Ben by westclox from him were he put a Indian motor cycle dial and the motor cycle ticks back and forth kind of cool. And the price was right cheaper that buying a fixer upper on Ebay then paying another to service it. Goes good with the antique candle stick phone by the bed they both sound the same when they go off loud like a fire bell. I call this a fun clock probably the best deal I ever got for a clock.






    Got this poppy for a 100 bucks serviced and ready to go. And made in the United States of America

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    Member msa6712's Avatar
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    Nice catch, dad had a '47 Indian, how about that candlestick phone? Is it working?
    msa6712
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    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msa6712 View Post
    Nice catch, dad had a '47 Indian, how about that candlestick phone? Is it working?
    Yes it works if it goes off in the night when your sleeping you just about jump out of bed. There's a double bell I got mounted to a wooden plaque on the wall I use a double jack in the wall the bell and phone plug in it then a single line goes in the phone plug in the wall. There was a guy at the Alameda antique fair that sold these working antique phones I heard he past away some years ago. Dam he had working antique pay phones for sell just wished I also got one of those. He called him self the phone jack a cool dude just to bad he is gone now.

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    Member msa6712's Avatar
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    WoW, that's pretty cool.
    I've got a candlestick phone from the 70s with a modern plug, but I also have an antique payphone as well as others...
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    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    I feel like Eliot Ness from the untouchables when I use that phone

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    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    The next antique I want a vintage slot machine there's a guy in Billings MT I saw on MT backroads that rebuilds them and when weather get better road trip. I think I have enough watches time to have fun stuff around the house.

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    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Here is the link with the sales ad for the clock I bought look at the last photo you will see the motor cycle moving back and forth I thought that was different. That sold me on it.
    http://www.timefixers.com/product-pa...9-8078b576fb2c

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    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by msa6712 View Post
    WoW, that's pretty cool.
    I've got a candlestick phone from the 70s with a modern plug, but I also have an antique payphone as well as others...
    Here is a shot of the candle stick phone check out porcelain on the numbers were you dial they don't build them like this any more. Parts of the phone has bakelite like the horn you talk in and the micro phone you put to your ear. The guy I bought this from goes through them so there like brand new and will work today from any phone plug in your house.



    The ringer made by bell western electric and loud as hell.

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    Member msa6712's Avatar
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    Elliott Ness is the perfect attribution to the candlestick phone of the Roaring 20's. Vintage one-armed bandits are expensive but also on my radar for a future purchase, maybe it would pay itself off in a couple of years if it keeps the Mrs out of the casinos...😂.

    Thanks for sending the link, I've added it to my faves.
    Here's a couple of pics of my 70s retro-modern candlestick phone and the old vintage pay phone...





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    I bet you keep that payphone in the guest bedroom!



    I posted this alarm watch here before, but you may have missed it. It's by J.C. Penny and is from the 1950's.








    Next to my Omega Geneve, to give a sense of size.







    Real quality stitched leather strap and gold plated buckle.



    Farewell to WTU

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    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    I worked for the Phone Co in California for about 40 years total. For 10 years I was an installer and repairman. In the late 60s early 70s You would run into these candlesticks and the next generation of cradle phone 202s still in use. I even found a hand crank magneto wall phone once. The ultimate find was the Imperial with gold plated oval base and white hand set even more rare was the Continental. Those western electric phones were so well built and so expensive it was unreal. They were bulletproof and the sound quality was unreal. RRs phone has the bell box with it which is the absolute best way to have them. Some were rebuilt with cheap Chinese circuitry that would fit inside the small base. They work but not even close to having the original bell box. The only difference as they progressed was the shape of the handset to make them ergonomic. Try holding the early handset between your shoulder and your ear and it just doesn't work. The payphone looks like a 236. I used to install and work on those too. All of this equipment was terribly expensive but it was the best money could buy. That's the reason why you the customer provides the phone nowadays.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    I worked for the Phone Co in California for about 40 years total. For 10 years I was an installer and repairman. In the late 60s early 70s You would run into these candlesticks and the next generation of cradle phone 202s still in use. I even found a hand crank magneto wall phone once. The ultimate find was the Imperial with gold plated oval base and white hand set even more rare was the Continental. Those western electric phones were so well built and so expensive it was unreal. They were bulletproof and the sound quality was unreal. RRs phone has the bell box with it which is the absolute best way to have them. Some were rebuilt with cheap Chinese circuitry that would fit inside the small base. They work but not even close to having the original bell box. The only difference as they progressed was the shape of the handset to make them ergonomic. Try holding the early handset between your shoulder and your ear and it just doesn't work. The payphone looks like a 236. I used to install and work on those too. All of this equipment was terribly expensive but it was the best money could buy. That's the reason why you the customer provides the phone nowadays.


    Snap, I worked for ten years+ as a British Telelcom sub-contractor. Mostly damaged/repair work on the poles, and cabling overhead and underground.
    Did a lot of new cabling into the houses too, and only ever saw one vintage phone. Met some pretty strange people though. One guy let me in, and I had to trudge over a carpet that had drifts of dog hair up against the skirting about four inches high. A path was worn through the hair into the kitchen where the phone box was situated, and when I got down to remove the cover I noticed all this hair consisted of very long (over six inches) straight ones and shorter, curly ones. I looked over at the homeowner and he had really long, greasy hair and a big bushy beard. There was no dog in the house either...
    Farewell to WTU

  13. #13
    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Dave my step mom worked for the phone company in Calif she retired in 1986 when it was Pacific Bell Telephone Company back in the days when operators were more important so probably worked there about the same time you did when they did not screw there workers. My brother in-law worked for them and another friend after AT&T bought them out not a great place to work for now they both hated it. I thought I got away from AT&T when I moved to MT they just bought out DIRECTV so now I am stuck with them again mite go dish there cheaper. Dave you should buy beat up antique phone if you can get them cheap fix them up were they work for todays phone lines and there mite be a profit in it for you I was checking prices on them on the net for fixed up working antique phones and dam the price has shot up on them.

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    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    The supply of genuine Western Electric material is long gone. Those bell boxes also contain the network which is essential. The phone itself is just a set of switches for the receiver, dial, charcoal filled transmitter and receiver. The bell boxes were hard to find in '91 when I retired. I went to work for PT&T in 1964 as a lineman. Drafted in 1965 back from the war in 1967 the Company bridged my time in the Army to my work service and I retired as an engineer in 1991 with full pension and medical/dental @ 47. I was with cable TV for five years and hired back as a contract engineer by Pacific Telesis. I technically worked for Randstad but was really a PT employee.

    PT&T became Pacific Telesis and they ran it into the ground retaining only 5% of profits in a business that required at least 20%. The rest went straight into the pockets of shareholders. What made PT valuable was that the company owned the switching side of the house instead of AT&T owning it like all other old bell companies. That was a gold mine as every call made by other companies had to pay an access fee. PT was making 33% of their revenue from access charges. They even let the switches go to hell. It eventually sold to SBC which was Texas' company for a fire sale price of $19B probably half of what it was worth before they looted it. SBC introduced their gestapo method of running a company and promptly tossed out all of those decades of great service and employee loyalty. They bought out At&T and now concentrate on cell phone business. They are trying to unload the copper/glass network to anyone who will take it. Once the danger of using cells was successfully swept under the rug, the switched side died a slow death. That's why fixing up old phones isn't worth the time any more; the hard wired telephone from a phone company is dead meat.

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