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Thread: WW2 Glashutte Tutima and Hanhart restorations

  1. #21

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    assume that the red paint on the bezel notch was original and factory applied?[/QUOTE]

    Its lipstick isn't it....?
    Superb work there Andy

  2. #22
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    Incredible work. Thanks much for lead us through the experience - like living vicariously through you!

  3. #23
    Member Reintitan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aleftley View Post
    The original hands and dial lume is radium and needs special precautions due to the potential radioactive danger - you certainly do not want any in your sandwiches!
    I always de-lume hands etc. under water so that debris is contained + standard precautions like disposable gloves and face mask etc.
    The replacement lume is non-radioactive and a custom mix to give the right vintage colour and degree of luminosity. Andy
    Stay safe with that stuff Andy. Thanks for the info!

  4. #24
    Member Horlogerie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aleftley View Post
    The original hands and dial lume is radium and needs special precautions due to the potential radioactive danger - you certainly do not want any in your sandwiches!
    I always de-lume hands etc. under water so that debris is contained + standard precautions like disposable gloves and face mask etc.
    The replacement lume is non-radioactive and a custom mix to give the right vintage colour and degree of luminosity. Andy
    I try and avoid even working on any radium watches if possible, most times the radium is falling out and radio active dust and bits tend to be all over the dial and inside the case. The odds of cancer may be low from exposure, but I prefer to not take chances...

    So what happens to the radium you have removed, how does one dispose of it safely? That is one problem I have not been able to solve, not many places accept radioactive waste.
    British Horological Institute Professional Watchmaker

    Visit my watchmaking blog at:

    www.roberthoran.eu

  5. #25

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    Yes good point - UK HSE legislation has tightened over recent years but I understand that there are different guidelines internationally. Best contact your local authorities for advice. Andy

  6. #26
    Member Grentch's Avatar
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    That's a fantastic job Sir! How a sympathetic restoration should go. Kudos.
    Careful now....

  7. #27
    Member fotopetar's Avatar
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    Great restauration!

  8. #28

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    Absolutely brilliant work!

    Can you tell me how you cleaned the dial? What solutions and tools you used?

    thanks

  9. #29

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    Hi Todd,
    I only use water when cleaning dials. Tools used are mainly a range of different disposable swabs which are sold through most horological suppliers - they are available in a variety of designs and materials (foam, rubber cotton etc.). Also a range of disposable wood and plastic probes for detailing - nothing sharp which could cause damage. Radiological health & safety paramount combined with a need to proceed with caution and care not to cause damage. Andy

  10. #30
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    That looks like some awesome work!

    I always like it when I see something that was old and broken get carefully restored back to it's original running condition, while still preserving the history, rather than simply being thrown away or totally refurbished.

    You mention it's a later war watch. Did it look to you like any corners were cut in making the movement or the parts other than not taking time to plate them?

  11. #31

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    No - all excellent quality - just wartime restrictions caused the change to non-plated movements plus the standard regulation instead of fine.
    The fact that these watches can be kicked into life and run perfectly 70+ years later stands as testament to the original quality in my view.
    Andy

  12. #32

    Post Hanhart cal. 41 restoration - Part 2

    Hi Guys,

    I thought you may like to see this two pusher Hanhart which I have recently worked on for a customer in the USA.

    The 'before' shots below show the deterioration and bodges which had been inflicted on it over the decades. The hands lume was breaking down, there were no pushers and one pusher tube had been blanked by ramming a brass plug down it! The original strap was there and the leather was intact but the stitching had rotted and the strap was gradually falling apart. The movement was also very dirty and obviously had been static for a very long time.

    The watch was completely stripped followed by a re-build and oiling. I re-lumed the hands and aged them to match the dial, the strap was completely re-stitched and the leather treated.

    The old plexi-glass that was fitted looked original but turned out not to be so as it was slightly too shallow and left virtually nil clearance for the hands - so a suitable replacement was fitted.

    The watch is now back with the owner in the USA and he tells me it is ticking away nicely - all ready for the next 70+ years !

    Before :-







    After :-



    Last edited by dave; 07-07-2016 at 15:03. Reason: title.

  13. #33

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    After everything that watch went through over the decades, the dial still looked magnificent!

    Excellent work Aleftley Looks really beautiful.

  14. #34
    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    A really nice job on the service and restoration on that Hanhart.

  15. #35
    Member Lange's Avatar
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    Great work as always Andy, I wish I had a WWII HH I could send over

    Did you record/photo the dial back side stamps W+B, WC etc?

    /L

  16. #36
    Senior Member Joe A.'s Avatar
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    But what happened to the brass plug? Nicely done Sir!

  17. #37

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    Hi Lange,
    The dial had the WC logo for Wilhelm Cammart in Pforzheim and was dated to Sept. 1943.
    Andy

  18. #38
    Member Lange's Avatar
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    thanks

  19. #39

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    Very nice! Bravo!

  20. #40

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    Good Job and Thanks to share the pictures. The Cal. 41 looks really nice. I wonder how the pusher buttons came off, the strap, which was the weakest point from issuing, survived?
    SMS Viribus Unitis 1911

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