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Thread: WW2 Glashutte Tutima and Hanhart restorations

  1. #1

    Post WW2 Tutima restoration - back from the dead ! Part 1

    Hi Guys
    Just thought I would show you some pics of a GH restoration which I have just finished for a customer in the USA. The watch is the later type without the dial writing, unplated movement and standard regulation.

    The watch was a vet bring back from WW2 and had laid completely undisturbed in a time warp for the last 70 years. As you can see in the following pics the hands lume had suffered with the passage of time and had really stuck onto the dial. The movement was siezed solid due to water having leaked down the winding stem. Also the strap was disintegrating where it joined the watch. I love a challenge !

    Before :-







    When I stripped and cleaned the watch it was revealed to be in generally very good condition, especially the case which has excellent plating with very little wear. The movement cleaned up nicely and I fitted a new mainspring. All the eccentric adjusters for the chrono mechanism were siezed solid and had to be punched out and freed up. I re-lumed the hands and cleaned up the dial. The plexi-glass is the original - a few marks to show its age.

    After plenty of hours I got it back together this weekend and it is keeping excellent time again - awake after a long sleep !!!

    After :-






    Last edited by dave; 07-07-2016 at 14:08. Reason: title.

  2. #2

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    Fantastic job. I'm sure your customer will be very happy.

  3. #3

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    Outstanding! Nice work!

  4. #4
    Member Lange's Avatar
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    Great work - congrats with the result. What is the green gunk seen in the first pics? I recieved an Auricoste recently with the same green stuff all over the spring bars and in the bezel.

  5. #5
    Moderator Syrte's Avatar
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    Beautiful! How do you clean stuff like this? (with ultra sounds?) Congrats!

  6. #6
    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Nice work

  7. #7

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    Beautiful work! Really well done

  8. #8
    Senior Member Joe A.'s Avatar
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    "Well dip my in shit and roll me in sugar!" That is down right amazing. Well done Mr. Aleftely, well done! Joe A.

  9. #9

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    Very well done. I am amazed at how talented some of you gentleman are in sympathetic restoration. Thanks for sharing. - KK

  10. #10
    Member pilotswatch's Avatar
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    Great job.
    Has the case been polished or was it refinished?

  11. #11
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    I have the 1999 re-release of this watch & they are a work of art.

  12. #12
    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lange View Post
    Great work - congrats with the result. What is the green gunk seen in the first pics? I recieved an Auricoste recently with the same green stuff all over the spring bars and in the bezel.
    It is called verdigris. It is caused by chemical reaction of acetic acids from the air and acids from the wearer's body. It goes after leather as well as metals. I've found that it is a pretty benign acid as there is almost never any damage to the parent metal after verdigris is removed. A solution of baking soda and warm water will remove verdigris

  13. #13
    Member Carlton-Browne's Avatar
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    A sterling effort - bloody well done . Is there no purpose that baking soda can not be used for?

  14. #14

    Default WW2 Luftwaffe Glashutte Tutima chronograph

    Hi guys,

    Thank you all for your kind words - I really enjoyed bringing this watch back to life and the end result justifies the hours spent.

    The case and the case plating of the watch is in really great original condition and there has been no re-plating or polishing done (perish the thought!). I only clean cases with a warm water + a little mild liquid detergent to remove the verdigis and dirt. I have seen far too many cases ruined by polishing to ever go down that route and much prefer the original finish even if it does have some battle scars.

    The watch is late war and was put away by a returning GI so it probably had very little use which accounts for the excellent case condition. The photo lighting makes the nickel plating look bright but it is actually a typical dull grey colour which can be seen better in the following couple of pics taken in daylight in typical UK weather!

    Movements are cleaned using an ammoniated watch cleaning solution in my 1960's Elma cleaning machine followed by a rinse in a special watch rinsing solution prior to drying with heat.


    Last edited by dave; 06-30-2016 at 13:14. Reason: title.

  15. #15
    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
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    beautiful...

    that's a great find there for someone and a top notch and sympathetic restoration there Andy, well done.

    and there was me thinking that this one was on it's way to Texas; LOL.

    assume that the red paint on the bezel notch was original and factory applied?

  16. #16

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    Hi Dave,
    Thanks for that, it is a great watch and it was a real pleasure to work on such an original example.
    The red marker at 12 'O' clock on the bezel is indeed all original. Actually the red markers were never red paint but were a thin piece of red plastic material glued into place. Most of them have vanished over the years. Andy

  17. #17

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    This was a most instructive and enjoyable thread. I think anybody here would be proud to own the watch you restored. Thanks for sharing!!!
    Cordially,
    ~Burgs


    I've been up early my whole life, and all that ever did was increase the amount of time during the day that something could go wrong... - Inspector O

  18. #18
    Member Reintitan's Avatar
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    Really shows what an expert craftsman can do and how robust and long lasting mechanical watches are. In 70 years all these quartz watches will be only good for the recycling bin for their metal bits.

    How did you deal with luminous paint especially on the crystal? Is it radium (doesn't look like it) or zinc sulfide?

  19. #19

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    The original hands and dial lume is radium and needs special precautions due to the potential radioactive danger - you certainly do not want any in your sandwiches!
    I always de-lume hands etc. under water so that debris is contained + standard precautions like disposable gloves and face mask etc.
    The replacement lume is non-radioactive and a custom mix to give the right vintage colour and degree of luminosity. Andy

  20. #20
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    To me, this is what collecting watches is all about not to mention seeing what a real watchmaker can do. Bravo!

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