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Thread: Full English

  1. #1
    Member Reintitan's Avatar
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    Default Full English

    Err...no, not that kind of Full English.



    I wish...



    I'll have to settle for this kind...


  2. #2
    Senior Member Joe A.'s Avatar
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    Hmmmmm...the second photo on the page doesn't fully load. I am assuming she's wearing an English military watch somewhere on her body, say a Longines "Big Indian?" Joe A.

  3. #3
    Member simonk's Avatar
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    And the first photo is obviously a cheap copy - fake English breakfast makers always miss the black pudding.

  4. #4
    Senior Member foilguy's Avatar
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    And that looks suspiciously like eggy bread, not fried bread. Second and third photos correct in all areas though.

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    Member Carlton-Browne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by foilguy View Post
    And that looks suspiciously like eggy bread,
    French toast? FRENCH TOAST???

  6. #6

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    Nice case and dial on the second picture and the Smiths is very nice as well.

  7. #7
    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
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    hmmm.

    the first image is a fake: those ain't heinz baked beans and that's definitely an EU sausage.

    the second image is not entirely original either, although kate was born and bred in Chiswick.

    her father was of one-quarter Burmese descent.

    this image finally loaded after two hours; are they really nato straps?

    as for the third image: haven't got a clue what S_YT is...

  8. #8
    Member namib's Avatar
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    First pic looks like someone else has eaten that before ... Urrrghhhhh !!!!!
    Second pic is taken 10 minutes too early !
    3 pic... whats that ?

  9. #9
    Senior Member foilguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dave View Post
    hmmm.


    ......the second image is not entirely original either, although kate was born and bred in Chiswick.

    her father was of one-quarter Burmese descent...
    Isn't that what it actually takes to be British, a good mix over the generations. Mine charts back to Irish, Spanish and Romanian, if you go back far enough.

  10. #10
    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    Paul,
    English, Scotch Irish and Welsh and I'm a Yank. Me Mum's a Bruce.

    English breakfast is odd, blood pudding is awful. Canned beans and tomato for breakfast?

    The Ms is English and German.

  11. #11
    Member ceanag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    Paul,
    English, Scotch Irish and Welsh and I'm a Yank. Me Mum's a Bruce.

    English breakfast is odd, blood pudding is awful. Canned beans and tomato for breakfast?
    Scots .. Scotch is a drink

  12. #12
    Administrator ianp's Avatar
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    FWIW Scotch is an old fashioned way of referring to those north of the border. You still hear it in the US as some old English words live on here (e.g. fall instead of autumn).

    IAP
    Order of the Invisible Ethereal Electron with Crossed Wizard's Wands

  13. #13
    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceanag View Post
    Scots .. Scotch is a drink
    We refer to them as "Scotch Irish" no one in my family ever called it anything else. As I said, my mother was a Bruce and worse yet her mother was a Hackett and related to Sir Thomas Hackett Lord Mayor of Dublin 1687-1688. So I suspect that we had to leave, one being a traitor and the other a carpetbagger. Grandmother Hackett's father, my great grandfather, was a US deputy marshal in Oklahoma Indian Territory, kind of like True Grit. My great uncle Lt Frank Bruce was captain of the minesweeper Bobolink and was killed clearing mines in the North Sea after WW1. A US Destroyer was named after him for his heroic act.

  14. #14
    Member ceanag's Avatar
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    "Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irish may refer to: The Ulster Scots people, an ethnic group in Ulster, Ireland, who trace their roots to settlers from Scotland. Scotch-Irish Americans, descendants of Ulster Scots who first migrated to America in large numbers in the 18th and 19th centuries."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch-Irish

    It appears the term Scotch Irish is an Americanism .. I spent my formative years in Belfast and have an Ulster Scots heritage and none of my friends or family would ever use the American term. I have also spent some time in Scotland and have never heard a Scot/Scottish person refer to himself as Scotch.
    All just interesting nuances of the English language depending on your background and where you live.

  15. #15
    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    I believe that is what is going on. There was a fabulous show on TV awhile ago hosted by Jim Webb. Basically a celebration of the Scot-Irish or Scotch Irish and how they came here to grow and weave flax for linen and settled the area around Virginia. They also brought whisky with them.
    D

  16. #16
    Member Mark Wilson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceanag View Post
    "Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irish may refer to: The Ulster Scots people, an ethnic group in Ulster, Ireland, who trace their roots to settlers from Scotland. Scotch-Irish Americans, descendants of Ulster Scots who first migrated to America in large numbers in the 18th and 19th centuries."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotch-Irish

    It appears the term Scotch Irish is an Americanism .. I spent my formative years in Belfast and have an Ulster Scots heritage and none of my friends or family would ever use the American term. I have also spent some time in Scotland and have never heard a Scot/Scottish person refer to himself as Scotch.
    All just interesting nuances of the English language depending on your background and where you live.
    I was born and lived in Ulster until my late twenties, the majority of people consider themselves Ulster-Scots and in fact the Ulster-Scots language is the dialect predominantly spoken on the east coast of Ulster

    http://www.ulsterscotsagency.com/wha...cots/language/

    BTW my Scottish friends do not like being referring to as Scotch because they are Scots and proper whiskey is spelled whiskey

    M

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    Member simonk's Avatar
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    Hmmm... I doubt your Scottish friends would agree with that second statement.

  18. #18
    Senior Member foilguy's Avatar
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    Well i've learnt something. I never knew there was another way to spell Whiskey. Just assumed 'whisky' was a typo earlier

  19. #19
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    Some clarification on the spelling courtesy of the Master of Malt website:

    "The spelling of whisky, or whiskey, differs geographically. As a rule, American and Irish prefer ‘whiskey’ and the Scots, Canadians and the rest of the world’s single malt makers prefer ‘whisky’. This originated during the 19th century. For in around 1870, Scotch whisky was of very low quality, much of it being distilled poorly in Coffey stills. For exportation to America, the Irish distillers wanted to differentiate their product from the poorer Scotch whisky, thus they added the ‘e’ to mark the crucial distinction."

    All the best

    Sean

  20. #20
    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
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    very confusing; phew, luckily I only drink whiskies...

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