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Thread: Some dedication....

  1. #21
    Member Hallibag's Avatar
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    Inscription mentioning service in the Royal Army Medical Corps, engraved on a watch retailed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Sure would like to know the full story, there!




  2. #22

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    I like that!

  3. #23
    Moderator Syrte's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe A. View Post
    From some of my WWI watches...

    WW I Inscription photo WWI Inscription_zpsk9cn9keo.jpg
    Sorry, just seeing this -- could have told you it's just French.... it says, literally "The family of the Tourquenese soldier" (ie from the city of Tourcoing) ... "to its brave defender" or "to his brave defender" depending on context. " Julien Verbrugge 1914-1918".
    The straight translation is that the family of the soldier is giving to the defender of the family or to the defender of the soldier.
    So not clear from the straight wording alone that it was remitted to the family. Several interpretations.
    1/ family thanking deceased son for defending the nation -- on an item they keep as a memento or gave to someone else.
    2/ could be that Verbrugge saved the life of another soldier from Tourcoing, and this is the family of the soldier giving to the family of Verbrugge in thanks, after Verbrugge himself died.
    3/ could be Verbrugge's family gave this gift to a friend who tried to defend him and save his life.
    4/Or it could be they're remitting this to someone who defended them, and they are making the gift in the memory of their deceased son.
    5/ finally, if "the family" could ever refer to the soldiers comrads (brothers in arms?) - it could be a dedication from his comrads to him, after his passing?
    In any event, in the grammatical construct it sounds like the family of a soldier is giving the watch to a person who defended the family, or the soldier.
    Complicated!!

    Beautiful and moving inscription, in any event.

    Cheers,
    S

  4. #24
    Moderator Syrte's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Syrte View Post
    Sorry, just seeing this -- could have told you it's just French.... it says, literally "The family of the Tourquenese soldier" (ie from the city of Tourcoing) ... "to its brave defender" or "to his brave defender" depending on context. " Julien Verbrugge 1914-1918".
    The straight translation is that the family of the soldier is giving to the defender of the family or to the defender of the soldier.
    So not clear from the straight wording alone that it was remitted to the family. Several interpretations.
    1/ family thanking deceased son for defending the nation -- on an item they keep as a memento or gave to someone else.
    2/ could be that Verbrugge saved the life of another soldier from Tourcoing, and this is the family of the soldier giving to the family of Verbrugge in thanks, after Verbrugge himself died.
    3/ could be Verbrugge's family gave this gift to a friend who tried to defend him and save his life.
    4/Or it could be they're remitting this to someone who defended them, and they are making the gift in the memory of their deceased son.
    5/ finally, if "the family" could ever refer to the soldiers comrads (brothers in arms?) - it could be a dedication from his comrads to him, after his passing?
    In any event, in the grammatical construct it sounds like the family of a soldier is giving the watch to a person who defended the family, or the soldier.
    Complicated!!

    Beautiful and moving inscription, in any event.

    Cheers,
    S
    Okay, so something bugged me about this contrived phrase, "La Famille du Soldat Tourquennois".... turns out it was the name of a non profit charity or cooperative organization to help out soldiers and their families from the Tourcoing area. There are some 1916 newsletters digitized at the Lille municipal library - http://numerique.bibliotheque.bm-lil...382_191603_001
    They organized sending letters to families in "areas under invasion", clothing exchanges, finding soldiers accommodations when they went on leave...
    One has to believe this is a gift they gave to a soldier for services rendered during the war -- and that this guy has the same name as somebody else who died in 1916.
    Or they gave this watch to someone in his family, in memory of all the services he rendered.

  5. #25
    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
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    this one from a recent images from past auctions:


  6. #26
    Member Grentch's Avatar
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    This is the only one I have;



    Hallmarked 1916, but god knows when it was actually sold. Not a lot going on, or to go on. I'd love to know the story of the chap it belonged to, but never could find out on such slim pickings.
    Careful now....

  7. #27
    Member pilotswatch's Avatar
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    A few of mine:

  8. #28
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    ^ Those are fantastic!

  9. #29
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    A favorite of mine - far from military, but very entertaining...


  10. #30

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    awesome thread. Beautiful engravings, dedications and watches. All we need now is a watch owned by the USA's first flying ace. Oh no we don't.

  11. #31
    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
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    LOL, was waiting for that, there's always one; some more pictures please...


    actually some great workmanship here; just look at the albatross on the RNAS watch.
    Last edited by dave; 06-23-2016 at 14:07. Reason: spelling.

  12. #32
    MWR Bob's Avatar
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    Here you go..............

    the Order of the Escopeta Recortada with Crossed Grappling Hooks

  13. #33
    Junior Member albertoshort's Avatar
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    not military but nice... it is on a kingstone val.88

  14. #34
    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
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    Post USN




    does anyone know what the numbers mean - service number?

  15. #35
    Member obsoletewatchparts's Avatar
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    Default From Sir John Jellico

    came in a bagfull of movements I bought a few years back from a jeweller.
    From Sir John & Lady Jellicho https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_J..._Earl_Jellicoe
    to Mr Hardman see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everard_Hardman-Jones




  16. #36
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    Oh that Jellicoe one is great!

    Here is one of mine, 1914 Hallmarked Minerva:





    The paddington battery was the 14th County of London Royal Artillery, in the 5th Brigade of the London Regiment (47th Regiment). I haven’t yet nailed down the exact details of Cpl Williams.

    Can anyone suggest what .V.R. means?

  17. #37
    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trim View Post
    Can anyone suggest what .V.R. means?
    probably Volunteer Reserve.

    did you ever consider that it could be battalion instead of battery?

  18. #38
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    Default Seeing as you mention Jellicoe - (mil)watches on TV

    Screenshot from Jutland: WWI's Greatest Sea Battle showing pocketwatch used by Jellicoe during the Battle of Jutland which is still owned by the family. They mentioned a wristwatch also, but that was not shown.

    Order of the Invisible Ethereal Electron with Crossed Wizard's Wands

  19. #39

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    This thread just gets better and better, some amazing watches coming out!

  20. #40
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    Amazing thread, instantly a favorite!

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