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Thread: Some dedication....

  1. #41
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    Not on a watch but
    Thanks Dad for your service in the US Navy during WWII aboard the USS Merrimack 1942-1946

  2. #42

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    Here are a few I have tucked away. The owner of the Hebdomas survived the war, the others I still need to find out more on.






  3. #43
    Member obsoletewatchparts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by obsoletewatchparts View Post
    came in a bagfull of movements I bought a few years back from a jeweller.
    From Sir John & Lady Jellicho https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_J..._Earl_Jellicoe
    to Mr Hardman see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everard_Hardman-Jones



    Coincidentally, i just saw on the BBC 100 years ago exactly Admiral Sir John Jellicoe was involved in the Battle of Jutland, well worth watching..
    BBC TV http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode...-bloodiest-day

  4. #44
    Member T5AUS's Avatar
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    Default ITALIAN FLAIR

    Not much of a watch but I believe this engraving is the mark of a 1st WW Italian force, more research needed (or anyone recognise)

  5. #45
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    Major W.G. Wilson

    Walter Gordon Wilson CMG (18741957) was a mechanical engineer, inventor and member of the British Royal Naval Air Service. He was credited by the 1919 Royal Commission on Awards to Inventors as the co-inventor of the tank, along with Sir William Tritton

















    Alas slightly flawed as I think it's possible a Ladies watch ! Frock wearer ?

  6. #46
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    The engraving looks similar to an ordnance symbol used by US armed forces. Not sure about the initials inside.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcnanners View Post
    The engraving looks similar to an ordnance symbol used by US armed forces. Not sure about the initials inside.
    There is 4 repair scribes inside the case back i can make out years 1948 -52 -61 possible one earlier but cannot read it.
    Number in the case back is 5490132 and a 19 repeated on inner dust cover movement Cal 12882 S&Co.
    Would be nice to find out a little more, not convinced it is military sorry diameter is 32mm without crown.


    Is it common to have a red 12 Dial print I think says Jays London
    Thanks
    Lee

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by MBRADIO View Post
    Is it common to have a red 12 Dial print I think says Jays London
    Thanks
    Lee
    Try asking David Boettcher at Vintage Watch Straps, he knows a bit about trench watches
    "Early this year I saw ex-army watches exhibited in a showcase at a little under 4 each. A week or two later I succeeded in buying one of them for 5. Recently their price seems to have risen to 8." (George Orwell, "As I Please", Tribune, 29th November 1946)

  9. #49
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    Thanks Revo

    Will do.

    Regards
    Lee

  10. #50
    Super Moderator dave's Avatar
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  11. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by MBRADIO View Post
    There is 4 repair scribes inside the case back i can make out years 1948 -52 -61 possible one earlier but cannot read it.
    Number in the case back is 5490132 and a 19 repeated on inner dust cover movement Cal 12882 S&Co.
    Would be nice to find out a little more, not convinced it is military sorry diameter is 32mm without crown.


    Is it common to have a red 12 Dial print I think says Jays London
    Thanks
    Lee

    Lee, red "12" was common on military type watches from WW1 until the 1930's.
    The size is fine for a man too, the US military watches were all around 32mm until the 1960's. WW1 watches for men were between about 30-38mm.

  12. #52
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    bobbee

    thank you for the info,

    Regards
    Lee

  13. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by MBRADIO View Post
    bobbee

    thank you for the info,

    Regards
    Lee

    That's okay Lee.

    The "S & co." will probably be Stauffer and Co.

    Cheers, Bob.

  14. #54

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    Jays of London was originally a mourning outfitters, a very popular mode of dressing in the 19th.C.

    https://londonstreetviews.wordpress....ing-warehouse/

    They had a lot of frontage on Regent Street, and eventually expanded to more than just clothes, and included jewelry, shoes, drapery, flowers,handbags, etc.

  15. #55
    Member bubba48's Avatar
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    A short engraving but a long history





    http://orologi.forumfree.it/?t=67480849
    (I've recently left the italian forum O&P)

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