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Thread: is this a good price

  1. #1
    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Default is this a good price

    I saw a British issue Lee Enfield rifle dated 1943 for 299.00 not bad shape is that a ok price kind of on a issued gun kick lately saw it at a local shop been there a while mite even get them to go down in price a little due to that. At least 303 ammo is easy to find.

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    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    They made so many and so many different models. I really like the American made MK4s made by Savage and some of the Canadian arsenals. They are like the 03A3 Springfields with rear mounted aperture sights. Is it a good price? Sure, any milsurp for that price is good. But if it a shot out MK 1 it will just look good. The 303s tend to have headspace issues which means little with a rimmed round. I'd steer clear of jungle carbines MK5s I think they call them. They are unpleasant to shoot and kick and flash awful. Some of the MK4s were sold in this country unfired brand new. I'd REALLY go for one of those. All in all, a great battle rifle that held 10 shots, double what the Mauser and 03 held.

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    Administrator ianp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveH View Post
    They made so many and so many different models. I really like the American made MK4s made by Savage and some of the Canadian arsenals. They are like the 03A3 Springfields with rear mounted aperture sights. Is it a good price? Sure, any milsurp for that price is good. But if it a shot out MK 1 it will just look good. The 303s tend to have headspace issues which means little with a rimmed round. I'd steer clear of jungle carbines MK5s I think they call them. They are unpleasant to shoot and kick and flash awful. Some of the MK4s were sold in this country unfired brand new. I'd REALLY go for one of those. All in all, a great battle rifle that held 10 shots, double what the Mauser and 03 held.
    As DaveH says many manufacturers and models to choose from. With a date of 1943 it is most likely going to be a No III or IV. For sure check out the bore and the headspace. Note that it is possible to adjust the bolt for headspace by replacing or grinding the bolt head. No 4/5 had marked boltheads to assist with this.

    Yep, the No.5 has become known as "jungle carbines". They now attract a premium price and there are many fakes out there as it is relatively easy to bubba up a no 4 to make it look like a No 5 to the casual look.
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    Senior Member lysander's Avatar
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    In 1943 it would be a No. 4, Mk I (later, Mk 1). The No. 4, Mk 1 Rifle was produced by three plants, Maltby, Fazakerley & BSA Shirley in Britain, and for a short time by Long Branch in Canada, Long Branch quickly switched over to producing the Mk 1*. Savage in the US made a few No. 4, Mk 1 and sold these directly to the British, however, most of Savage's production was No. 4 Mk 1*s and were sold the the US Army, then they were transferred to the British via Lend-Lease. Hence, the Ordnance bombs....

    The point of manufacture can be determined by the serial number. Serial numbers all started with a two letter code followed by a 5 digit number, for Maltby the digit sequence was "1xxxx", for Fazackerley the digit sequence was "2xxxx" and BSA Shirley used "3xxxx". Long Branch and Savage used letter prefixes "L" for Long Branch, and "C for Savage (Chicopee Falls, MA).

    The No. 5, Mk 1, aka "jungle carbine" was actually not designed for the jungle. It was originally decided that a lighter weight, smaller, handier rifle was required in general. Unfortunately, in the lightening process, something unusual happened and it was found that the No. 5 would not hold a consistent zero. It was assumed that this was due to the lightening cuts made to the receiver.

    The No. Mk 2 is post war production. Some Mk 1s and Mk 1* were upgraded to Mk 2 standards, these became the Mk1/2 and the Mk 1/3 respectively.

    There are also several types of No.4s rechambered for 7.62 NATO, redesignated L8A1 through L8A5, depending on if they were converted from a Mk 1, Mk 1*, Mk 1/2 , Mk 1/3 or Mk 2.

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    Administrator ianp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lysander View Post
    In 1943 it would be a No. 4, Mk I (later, Mk 1). The No. 4, Mk 1 Rifle was produced by three plants, Maltby, Fazakerley & BSA Shirley in Britain, and for a short time by Long Branch in Canada, Long Branch quickly switched over to producing the Mk 1*. Savage in the US made a few No. 4, Mk 1 and sold these directly to the British, however, most of Savage's production was No. 4 Mk 1*s and were sold the the US Army, then they were transferred to the British via Lend-Lease. Hence, the Ordnance bombs....
    You'll find Ishapore, Lithgow and other manufacturer No 1 Mk IIIs dated >= 1943 out there.

    River Rat, did you pull the trigger - no pun intended - on it yet ?

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    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ianp View Post
    You'll find Ishapore, Lithgow and other manufacturer No 1 Mk IIIs dated >= 1943 out there.

    River Rat, did you pull the trigger - no pun intended - on it yet ?

    IAP
    Not yet I found a ww1 colt 1911 I should go for the Lee Enfield it sure is cheaper. The 1911 for sale for 1600 not a bad price for 80 % blueing some of the blueing missing on the pistol grip made in 1918

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    Administrator ianp's Avatar
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    Decisions, decisions. Both nice things to have in the gun safe.

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  8. #8
    Senior Member lysander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ianp View Post
    You'll find Ishapore, Lithgow and other manufacturer No 1 Mk IIIs dated >= 1943 out there.

    River Rat, did you pull the trigger - no pun intended - on it yet ?

    IAP
    Key words: "British Issue"

    Lithgows were Australian issue and Ishapores were Indian Army issue.

    Note, the Indian Army was a separate service from the British Army, even though India was still part of the Empire proper.....

    BTW, what other manufacturers were there in 1943?

    The No 1 (aka SMLE) Mk III* was only made by Lithgow and Ispore after 1942. The only other places that made then prior were RSAF Enfield and Sparkbrook, BSA and LSA*. Enfield and BSA switched to producing machinegun after 1942. The proction of the No4 was moved to three new plants mentioned earlier. Sparkbrook was bought by BSA in 1931, but had stopped making SMLEs long ago, and LSA closed down in 1935.

    *well there are the NRF and SSA marked WW1 copies, but these were piece parts guns...
    Last edited by lysander; 07-09-2014 at 10:02.

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