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Thread: WW2 US Army colt 1911 traing film

  1. #1
    Senior Member river rat's Avatar
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    Default WW2 US Army colt 1911 traing film

    Interesting how military pistol training has changed

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ro7N7dAmjLY
    Just point and shoot don't bother to use the sites well I got a vintage 1911 and the sites are kind of useless compared to the sites I had when in the Navy were in one unit we had the Sig 9 mil and the other a berretta 9 mil that had great sites and we were told to use them. Did use the 1911 in the 1980's before they did away with it the training was a little weak back then but improved through the years. Since we were talking a lot about 1911's thought I would post this.

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    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    I did quite a bit of this type of shooting with a 1911 using a pancake holster. This was in the early 70s when this type of competition was just getting started. I shot with a sheriff buddy of mine. If you practice enough, you will get very good at hitting where you point. The 7 yard line makes it easy to hit by pointing. The pistol never reaches the height of your eyes, it is more of a hand follows eyes exercise. The 1911 is a natural pointer almost made for this type of work.

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    Administrator ianp's Avatar
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    I put some enamel white paint on the front and rear sights of my RIA Tactical. Just couldn't get used to not having them. May buy some proper replacements at some point, I seem to recall the RIA use oddball sizings vs novak.

    Some of those tracer rounds would be nice, but a no-no in my state.

    IAP
    Order of the Invisible Ethereal Electron with Crossed Wizard's Wands

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    Played around with point shooting a might in the '80s. Used a really good pointing M39-2 Smith and Wesson which I still have.

    Got to be at least OK with it, but found it required a conscious switchover when circumstances required use of the sights-and that took precious time for me. So I went to sights all the time.

    Also at one time kept a CZ .25 in the door of my refrigerator-and it had no sights at all.

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    HA! Good one!!
    it took me a minute to get it...
    Matter of fact, I'm quite partial to that sort of radical customizing myself.

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    The issue I noticed was the total lack of ear protection. Also the very casual crossing of the instructor and the trainees with their "unloaded" weapons.

    The tracer rounds were cool, but a green laser can just about accomplish the same thing in daylight, before the shot is taken. I also use plastic rod sights that gather light.

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    Senior Member DaveH's Avatar
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    Not too long ago the Army just didn't really care about ear protection. You can't wear earmuffs in the field as you need that sense working at 100%. This is the reason that guys like me get a check from the VA every month. Having a battery of 105s shoot H&I over your hooch all night doesn't help either. Sitting in a C130 for 5-6 hours at 140 DB doesn't help either. Barrel discipline was left to be worked out by the troops in 1966. You watched out for the other dopes, experienced hunters didn't have the problem. I think a surplus of attorneys has changed a lot of things in the "Be all you can be" Army.

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    One of the interesting things to me about old 1911 training videos is one of them discusses people having to learn to point the 1911 because it doesn't point 'naturally'. It's a useful bit of background for discussions in which people say 1911s point 'naturally' and Glocks (for instance) don't.

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    The issue I noticed was the total lack of ear protection. Also the very casual crossing of the instructor and the trainees with their "unloaded" weapons.



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    sultan

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