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tristany3
05-24-2009, 10:16
Lead gaskets!?

Reading this forum I discovered that, some manufactures choose lead to make their gaskets, lead!?

I am a watchmaker myself and I have to say that I never encountered any such watch to date...

I can understand why the manufacturers where looking for an alternative solution to old rubber gaskets, as with sweat, those old gaskets tend to become stiff and brittle (and thus lose their airtightness) or other become a dark sticky jelly that's particularly difficult to remove.
And on a military watch, that's mean to be relatively maintenance free and expect a particular rough use, I can se a point on using those on the back... (anyway, I guess that on the crown where used standard rubber gaskets? Correct me if I'm wrong...

Recently, an article appeared showing an elgin canteen dive watch with the crystal fastened this way, with lead soldered lead!? Doesn't those watches use a plastic crystal? How come that the plastic does not melt, when the lead is poured in?

So, my question is as follows: when where used those lead gaskets and what where their purpose, or advantages over the standard gaskets of the day?

martin
05-24-2009, 10:39
Lead gaskets!?

Reading this forum I discovered that, some manufactures choose lead to make their gaskets, lead!?

I am a watchmaker myself and I have to say that I never encountered any such watch to date...

I can understand why the manufacturers where looking for an alternative solution to old rubber gaskets, as with sweat, those old gaskets tend to become stiff and brittle (and thus lose their airtightness) or other become a dark sticky jelly that's particularly difficult to remove.
And on a military watch, that's mean to be relatively maintenance free and expect a particular rough use, I can se a point on using those on the back... (anyway, I guess that on the crown where used standard rubber gaskets? Correct me if I'm wrong...

Recently, an article appeared showing an elgin canteen dive watch with the crystal fastened this way, with lead soldered lead!? Doesn't those watches use a plastic crystal? How come that the plastic does not melt, when the lead is poured in?

So, my question is as follows: when where used those lead gaskets and what where their purpose, or advantages over the standard gaskets of the day?

The dive watch with the soldered crystal gasket had a glass crystal. These are old watches we're discussing. A lead crush gasket would have been the best option at the time. Materials science has come a long way since, but AFAIK, a lead gasket wasn't a bad thing. It's inert, it's not going to degrade, it keep the back snug.

lysander
05-24-2009, 12:23
I have seen lead seal in the backs of watches from the fifties. Lead has certain advantages over rubber of the 1950's. It does not degrade, it's cheaper, You can make the gaskets yourself.

A well done lead seal is reasonably water tight.

Using lead solder for the crystal is better than a rubber gasket. If the soldering is done correctly, the crystal and case become essentially one piece.

rolpaner
05-24-2009, 15:17
Lead gaskets!?

Reading this forum I discovered that, some manufactures choose lead to make their gaskets, lead!?

I am a watchmaker myself and I have to say that I never encountered any such watch to date...

I can understand why the manufacturers where looking for an alternative solution to old rubber gaskets, as with sweat, those old gaskets tend to become stiff and brittle (and thus lose their airtightness) or other become a dark sticky jelly that's particularly difficult to remove.
And on a military watch, that's mean to be relatively maintenance free and expect a particular rough use, I can se a point on using those on the back... (anyway, I guess that on the crown where used standard rubber gaskets? Correct me if I'm wrong...

Recently, an article appeared showing an elgin canteen dive watch with the crystal fastened this way, with lead soldered lead!? Doesn't those watches use a plastic crystal? How come that the plastic does not melt, when the lead is poured in?

So, my question is as follows: when where used those lead gaskets and what where their purpose, or advantages over the standard gaskets of the day?

The WW11 Rolex/Panerai 3646 watches had lead seals, one on the bezel side & one to the rear case.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v241/rolpaner/reminicse/rem14.jpg

Regards

James Dowling
05-24-2009, 15:55
Lead gaskets!?

Reading this forum I discovered that, some manufactures choose lead to make their gaskets, lead!?

I am a watchmaker myself and I have to say that I never encountered any such watch to date...

I can understand why the manufacturers where looking for an alternative solution to old rubber gaskets, as with sweat, those old gaskets tend to become stiff and brittle (and thus lose their airtightness) or other become a dark sticky jelly that's particularly difficult to remove.
And on a military watch, that's mean to be relatively maintenance free and expect a particular rough use, I can se a point on using those on the back... (anyway, I guess that on the crown where used standard rubber gaskets? Correct me if I'm wrong...

Recently, an article appeared showing an elgin canteen dive watch with the crystal fastened this way, with lead soldered lead!? Doesn't those watches use a plastic crystal? How come that the plastic does not melt, when the lead is poured in?

So, my question is as follows: when where used those lead gaskets and what where their purpose, or advantages over the standard gaskets of the day?

Hi T;

Welcome to the board.

The original Rolex Oysters from 1926 used lead gaskets; they have the advantage of being compressible and not susceptible to degradation by environmental changes. But on the downside they could fracture, and if they did, they would obviously no longer be watertight.

DaveH
05-24-2009, 20:08
When I was in Bath, the 2000 year old Roman pool was lined with folded sheet lead and it still holds water just fine. Lead is a great useful substance and gets a bad rap from environmentalists. They've moved it up to the danger level of plutonium or the like.
DHH

lysander
05-24-2009, 20:21
When I was in Bath, the 2000 year old Roman pool was lined with folded sheet lead and it still holds water just fine. Lead is a great useful substance and gets a bad rap from environmentalists. They've moved it up to the danger level of plutonium or the like.
DHH
That is partly in an attempt to make it impossible to get bullets, and make shooting ranges unavailable.

But, that's another subject.

I'll put my lead foil hat on an stay indoors...

DaveH
05-25-2009, 10:21
I live 50 miles north of SF right in the belly of the beast. We've got millions of illegals, and the lousy liberals that let them in to stay. They are very definitely trying to use the lead contamination as an issue. They have successfully blocked off most of the state from using lead bullets for hunting and are constantly raising the lead issue at shooting ranges. Like there are babies playing in the mud around the target stands? I hate these people. The possession on a single tracer round is a felony. The possession of a machine gun is legal in Nevada, but here a tracer makes you a felon. It is ok for gay men to perform sex acts openly on the streets of San Francisco, but better not have any tracers.

dave
05-26-2009, 09:22
Reading this forum I discovered that, some manufactures choose lead to make their gaskets, lead!?

I am a watchmaker myself and I have to say that I never encountered any such watch to date...

I've come across many watches, both military and civilian, with a lead seal on the caseback. If I have a watch serviced, which has one, and the lead seal is in good condition I usually tell my watch repairer to leave it it be!

Replacement seals are usually thicker and don't nip up so much which quite often means that the movement rattles around!


Regards,

Dave.